How Has Your Lawn Withstood The Winter?

The pH of your lawn is the measure of the acidity in the soil that it is being nourished by. Landscape professionals suggest that levels be tested every few years in order to determine what nutrients may need to be added to the soil to make your lawn look as healthy as possible. The ideal ratio that you’re looking for will depend on the type of grass you are trying to grow.

The measuring scale goes from 0-14. A level of 8 or higher on the scale will indicate that the acid content in the soil is lower than average. If your test shows that the soil is lacking in acidity you may want to apply sulfur in an attempt to bring the pH level back to normal. On the other hand, a soil sample that results in a lower pH content may indicate the need for lime.

Early spring is the time to check your lawn for signs of the soil having become compacted or to see if there are any noticeably high or low areas that could interfere with a well-proportioned appearance. A skilled maintenance crew will take the appropriate steps to build up or even out where needed so that when you’re ready to start mowing again you will have a clear and level terrain.

If your soil has become so packed together that the roots of your grass can’t reach through and catch hold, the stronger weeds will invade and win out. To prevent this from happening lawn maintenance will aerate the yard to loosen the soil.

Fertilizing can be tricky. If it is not done at the right time of year or in the proper way it may do more harm than good. Unless your lawn has been damaged over the winter or you can see a lot of patchy spots it may not require fertilization at all.

If your landscaper adviser recognizes the need for fertilizer he will want to wait until April to apply it. Right now the grass is growing new roots. Early fertilization can interfere with that process.

This is the perfect time to contact your Co-Cal Landscape representative and make a plan to have an early spring inspection of your lawn. Call Co-Cal @ 303-578-4788.

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