Take Winter Precautions

The cold weather months have arrived but that is no reason to stop taking care of our lawn and landscape. There are things we can do to protect our plants from the cold and ways to avoid damaging them with winter weather defenses.

Road salts for instance, that townships and property managers use to keep our traffic ways cleared of snow and ice can be harmful to our plants and shrubs. There are some safety measures that homeowners can take to minimize the risk.

We can’t hope to completely eliminate caustic materials from coming in contact with our lawns but we can minimize the impact. When you know that a substantial snowstorm is forecast in your area you can bet that the salt trucks will soon be out in full force. Even though you appreciate the fact that you will be able to get to work the next morning you also worry that the excess salting material will injure your grass. Burlap bags around the perimeters of your lawn can be used to absorb a lot of the salt mixture.

The acidic content in most road salts is what harms your grass. Spreading limestone over your lawn will counteract the acidity. Salty snow is likely to collect in the cracks between the concrete of your sidewalk and your lawn. Use pieces of hardscape to create a buffer between them so that less of the snow will melt into your grass. Decorative rock will serve this purpose and make a nice looking winter border as well.

Don’t do anything that might contribute to the pollution of your lawn. Use sand or kitty litter instead of deicing chemicals on your outdoor steps.

While you’re protecting it don’t forget to continue to feed and water your lawn despite the cold weather. Plants need moisture in the winter as well, but always water below the soil to keep the leaves from icing over. A layer of mulch will help retain the water. Fertilize your plants with a nitrogen/oxygen compound that will provide the nourishment they need throughout the winter.

Contact Co-Cal Landscape @ 303-578-4788 for your year round lawn care needs.

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